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  • Knee Osteoarthritis Knee Osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis also called degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint (cartilage).In a person with osteoarthritis, the cartilage becomes damaged and worn out causing pain, swelling, stiffness and restricted movement in the affected joint.

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  • Meniscal Tears Meniscal Tears

    There are two wedge-shaped cartilage pieces present between the thighbone and the shinbone each called a meniscus. The menisci stabilize the knee joint and act as shock absorbers.

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  • Knee Pain Knee Pain

    Knee pain is a common condition affecting individuals of various age groups. It not only affects movement but also impacts your quality of life. An injury or disease of the knee joint or any structure surrounding the knee can result in knee pain. A precise diagnosis of the underlying cause is important to develop an appropriate treatment plan.

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  • Knee Dislocation Knee Dislocation

    Knee dislocation is a condition that occurs when the bones that form the knee joint, namely the femur or thigh bone get separated from the shin bone. This can cause serious damage to the nerves, blood vessels, and ligaments surrounding the knee, leading to a decline in strength and overall health of the leg.

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  • Jumper's Knee Jumper's Knee

    Jumper’s knee, also known as patellar tendinitis, is inflammation of the patellar tendon that connects your kneecap (patella) to your shinbone. This tendon helps in the extension of the lower leg.

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  • Kneecap Bursitis Kneecap Bursitis

    Bursitis refers to the inflammation and swelling of the bursa. Inflammation of the bursa in front of the kneecap (patella) is known as kneecap bursitis or prepatellar bursitis.

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  • Knee Sprain Knee Sprain

    Knee sprain is a common injury that occurs from overstretching of the ligaments that support the knee joint. A knee sprain occurs when the knee ligaments are twisted or turned beyond its normal range, causing the ligaments to tear.

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  • Knee Fracture Knee Fracture

    A fracture is a condition in which there is a break in the continuity of the bone. In younger individuals, these fractures are caused by high energy injuries, as from a motor vehicle accident. In older people, the most common cause is a weak and fragile bone.

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  • Patella Fracture Patella Fracture

    The kneecap or patella forms a part of the knee joint. It is present at the front of the knee, protecting the knee and providing attachment to various muscle groups of the thigh and leg. The undersurface of the kneecap and the lower end of the femur are coated with articular cartilage, which helps in smooth movement of the knee joint. A fracture in the kneecap is rare but common in adult males.

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  • Fractures of the Tibia Fractures of the Tibia

    A crack or break in the tibia is referred to as a tibial fracture. The tibia is the most frequently fractured long bone of the body. It normally takes a great amount of force for a fracture of the tibia to occur.

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  • Tibial Shaft Fracture Tibial Shaft Fracture

    The lower leg is made up of two long bones called the tibia and fibula that extend between the knee and ankle and help form the ankle joint and knee joint. The tibia or shinbone is the larger of the two bones and is one of the major bones of the lower leg. It bears most of the body’s weight and plays a crucial role in balancing body weight when standing and walking.

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  • Tibial Plateau Fracture Tibial Plateau Fracture

    A tibial plateau fracture is a crack or break on the top surface of the tibia or shinbone in the knee joint. The fracture most often occurs following a high-intensity trauma or injury from the impaction of the femoral condyles over the tibial plateau. Fractures of the tibial plateau are serious injuries that are more commonly seen in athletes involved in high-impact sports such as basketball, rugby, and football and can put athletes out of action for a long period of time.

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  • Knee Stress Fractures Knee Stress Fractures

    Stress fractures of the patella or knee are very rare. Approximately two out of 10,000 athletes may experience a patella stress fracture. Initial symptoms include activity-related pain and then a fatigue stress fracture after minor trauma. The term insufficiency stress fracture is used for cases where the patella is weakened previously such as after patella resurfacing surgery.

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  • Stress Fracture of the Tibia Stress Fracture of the Tibia

    A stress fracture of the tibia or shinbone is a thin fracture, also called a hairline fracture that occurs in the tibia due to excess stress or overuse. The tibia is a weight-bearing bone in which stresses can accumulate from activities such as running and jumping.

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  • ACL Tears ACL Tears

    An ACL tear usually occurs with an abrupt directional change when the foot is fixed on the ground or when the deceleration force crosses the knee. Changing direction rapidly, stopping suddenly, slowing down while running, landing from a jump incorrectly, and direct contact or collision, such as a football tackle can also cause injury to the ACL.

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  • MCL Tears MCL Tears

    An MCL injury can result in a stretch, partial tear or complete tear of the ligament. Injuries to the MCL commonly occur because of pressure or stress applied the outside of the knee. The MCL injury can also tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

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  • MCL Sprains MCL Sprains

    MCL sprains occur due to a sudden impact from the outside of your knee, most commonly while playing sports such as rugby and football. Rarely, the MCL can get injured when the knee gets twisted or following a quick change in direction.

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  • Knee Injury Knee Injury

    Pain, swelling, and stiffness are the common symptoms of any damage or injury to the knee. If care is not taken during the initial phases of injury, it may lead to joint damage, which may end up destroying your knee.

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  • Knee Ligament Injuries Knee Ligament Injuries

    Knee problems may arise if any of these structures get injured by overuse or suddenly during sports activities. Pain, swelling, and stiffness are the common symptoms of any damage or injury to the knee.

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  • Meniscal Injuries Meniscal Injuries

    Meniscal tears are one of the most common injuries to the knee joint. It can occur at any age but are more common in athletes involved in contact sports. The meniscus has no direct blood supply and for that reason, when there is an injury to the meniscus, healing is difficult.

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  • Posterolateral Corner Injuries Posterolateral Corner Injuries

    Posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries are defined as damage to a complex area of the knee formed by the association of 3 main structures of the knee, namely popliteus tendon, popliteofibular ligament, and lateral (fibular) collateral ligament. Injuries to the posterolateral corner often occur in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears with isolated PCL injuries occurring rarely.

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  • Terrible Triad Injuries Terrible Triad Injuries

    A terrible triad injury can occur when the foot is firmly fixed on the ground and a strong force pushes the knee to the inside or causes a sudden twisting action. This can lead to overstretching, damage, or tears to the ligaments and medial meniscus.

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  • Multiligament Knee Injuries Multiligament Knee Injuries

    Injury to more than one knee ligament is called a multiligament knee injury and may occur during sports or other physical activities.

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  • Articular Cartilage Injury Articular Cartilage Injury

    Articular or hyaline cartilage is the tissue lining the surface of the two bones in the knee joint. Cartilage helps the bones move smoothly against each other and can withstand the weight of the body during activities such as running and jumping.

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  • PCL Injuries PCL Injuries

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), one of the four major ligaments of the knee, is situated at the back of the knee. It connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The PCL limits the backward motion of the shinbone.

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  • Knee Sports Injuries Knee Sports Injuries

    Trauma is any injury caused during physical activity, motor vehicle accidents, electric shock, or other activities. Sports trauma or sports injuries refer to injuries caused while playing indoor or outdoor sports and exercising.

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  • Multiligament Instability Multiligament Instability

    The knee is a complex joint of the body that is vital for movement. The four major ligaments of the knee are anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL). They play an important role in maintaining the stability of the knee. A multiligament injury is a tear in one or more ligaments of the knee, which affects the knee stability.

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  • Patellar Instability Patellar Instability

    Any damage to the supporting ligaments may cause the patella to slip out of the groove either partially (subluxation) or completely (dislocation). This misalignment can damage the underlying soft structures such as muscles and ligaments that hold the kneecap in place. Once damaged, these soft structures are unable to keep the patella (kneecap) in position. Repeated subluxation or dislocation makes the knee unstable.

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  • Medial Patellar Instability Medial Patellar Instability

    Medial patellar instability is a disabling condition characterized by medial subluxation of the patella which occurs as a complication of lateral retinacular release surgery. Lateral retinacular release is a surgical procedure employed for the treatment of lateral patellar instability. However, disruption of the lateral patellar structures during this surgery has been associated with medial patellar instability.

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  • Patellar Tendon Rupture Patellar Tendon Rupture

    The patellar tendon works together with the quadriceps muscle and the quadriceps tendon to allow your knee to straighten out. Patella tendon rupture is the rupture of the tendon that connects the patella (kneecap) to the top portion of the tibia (shinbone).

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  • Runner's Knee Runner's Knee

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome also called runner’s knee refers to pain under and around your kneecap. Patellofemoral pain is associated with a number of medical conditions such as anterior knee pain syndrome, patellofemoral malalignment, and chondromalacia patella. Patellofemoral pain is a common complaint among runners, jumpers, and other athletes such as skiers, cyclists, and soccer players; thus the common name, runner’s knee.

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  • Loose Bodies in the Knee Loose Bodies in the Knee

    Loose bodies are fragments of detached cartilage or bone inside the knee joint. These fragments may be free floating (unstable) or may be trapped (stable) within the joint. Depending on the severity, you may have one or more loose bodies in your knee joint.

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  • Patellar Tendinitis Patellar Tendinitis

    Patellar tendinitis, also known as "jumper's knee", is an inflammation of the patellar tendon that connects your kneecap (patella) to your shinbone. This tendon helps in extension of the lower leg.

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  • Meniscus Root Tear Meniscus Root Tear

    Meniscal root tears are characterized as soft tissue or bony root avulsion injuries or radial tears located within 1 cm of meniscus root attachment. They can be either a tear which disconnects the root area completely from the body of the meniscus (complete radial tear) or a disruption of the meniscus attachment directly from the bone (true meniscus root tear) that can cause the whole meniscus to lose its capacity to safeguard the underlying cartilage.

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  • Chondral or Articular Cartilage Defects Chondral or Articular Cartilage Defects

    The articular or hyaline cartilage is the tissue lining the surface of the two bones in the knee joint. Cartilage helps the bones move smoothly against each other and can withstand the weight of your body during activities such as running and jumping. Articular cartilage does not have a direct blood supply to it, so has less capacity to repair itself. Once the cartilage is torn it will not heal easily and can lead to degeneration of the articular surface, leading to the development of osteoarthritis.

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Vanderbilt Orthopaedics Lebanon

1616 West Main Street, Suite 300, Lebanon, TN 37087

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